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with us. here's a look at what is coming up today -- italy. a trip to a prison island. russia -- the desperate life of many orphans. france -- how architects want to improve life in the suburbs. first, to turkey and its relationship with religious minorities. some are officially recognized in turkey. jews, a greek orthodox, and armenian christians. the turkish government has made concessions to christian minorities, such as returning property confiscated a long time ago. churches, for example. that has given armenians in turkey in fresh confidence boost, but their situation remains difficult. ankara still refuses to recognize the genocide of armenians under ottoman rule 100 years ago. officially, there are some 60,000 armenians in turkey, but the numbers could be rising. in some parts of turkey, descendants of armenians are now rediscovering their identity. >> home to a population of more than 1 million, the city is situated on the turkey -- turkish/i iraqi border. it is the unofficial capital of turkey. but it was not always. between the many minuets that make up the skyline
and russia, among other things, acted as a mediator between those two factions. >> i'm sorry. and did not get the last of sentence. >> that russia, one of russia's rolls was sort of to mediate between two factions. i got the sense that priscilla buckley and burnham were sort of distant ancestors of neo conservatives and meyer, of course, being a fusion test some -- the fusion test would have disagreements. was primarily about what conservative should do about the welfare state. um wondering what russia's role was in as ideological debates. >> a very good question. i would commend something he says which is, i don't believe there was much conflict about what position to take on the welfare state, but there was some. it was not russia's primary concern. his primary concern in terms of radiology was that national review must be in the logical, that the exact positions it took would very often be secondary, but that insofar as it had certain believe some these issues, in the issues, it should be really serious about holding other conservatives and especially public office holders
with russia. a more powerful and emboldened china. an iran closer to a nuclear weapon, slark terrorists fans out across north america? simply put, under barack obama and hillary clinton, the u.s. has been unwilling to lead. and this has left a huge vacuum on the world stage. in a recent assessment of secretary clinton's tenure. michael owe o'hanlon of the brookings institute wrote even an admirers such as myself must admit few big problems were soflted on her watch. few big vic trises achieved. secretary clinton's work at the state department should be judged on whether she has left america's foreign policy in stronger or weaker position. most think the future lies with china than the u.s. it's not all mrs. clinton's fault. but the fact is we just don't have the influence we used to have around the world from syria to mali, we have led from behind, so in effect the former secretary of state has helped manage our decline in what looks increasingly like a post american world. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. another view on this, joining us now from new york, fox news contributor
-old boy. the question, what does it mean for other families trying to adopt from russia? implications of this little boy's death, straight ahead. we're back in a moment. with the spark cash card from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please. "buk, buk, bukka!" [ male announcer ] get the spark business card from capital one and earn unlimited rewards. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase every day. told you i'd get half. what's in your wallet? just one bite ope told you i'd get half. ♪ a flavor paradise wof delicious fishes ♪ ♪ friskies seafood sensations. ♪ feed the senses. >>> welcome back, everybody. our team, ron brownstein is back the "national journal." abby huntsman of huff post live and chuck blow. i love that you tweet you're coming on. you lea
, in talking about another country, russia. you know, russia desperately wants to reproduce itself to the rest of the world. and not in some of the main it has been. they get this opportunity with the g20 coming up in september. crystal ball, do you see anything from a coordination standpoint from the g20, and -- having out of this? this? and easy russia's image change? >> i think this is a big opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen in russia. we will just have to see. because they're sitting on all these oil reserves. we know where the price of oil is. but there as you know there's a lot of problems. and so we have to see whether communist, russia can show that it's taking some of these reforms it needs to take. and we will see. and this is a perfect opportunity to do so. so far i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did any thing positive was the one in london. and i give credit to gordon brown. that was his greatest moment i think at that particular time. do it. no, i mean come effect very organized meetings. i was in korea. there was no one who can organ
's nays is a when you need it? a meteor comes out of nowhre and explodes ver russia. you know how little nasa spends to predict these things? why it may be time to increase nasa's budget. i know you are skeptical, but wait until you hear this. plus, who wants to get on a cruise ship after this? can carnival and the cruise industry save reputations from drowning? a top marketing expert joins us on how to stay afloat. piles of "money" coming up. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur melissa: the story everybody is talking about. it explodes in the sky by russia. a thousand people injured, and the shock wave caused major cay yows blowing out windows, damaging buildings. this was just a little guy, by the way, theize of an suv, nothing compared to the apartment buildings sized astero that flew by just 17,000 miles away earlier th
to our friends in russia and china, the two members, to put the necessary leverage on the assad dictator in syria to leave and let people go to their new democratic government. >> thank you very much. >> my colleagues speaking to the turkish minister. that is almost the end of the program. just a reminder, you can find lots more material from the program on line, with interviews, analysis. visits the website. that is it for us this week. from all of us, good night. >> makes sense of international news. it >> funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, helping for having new ventures and to provide key, strategic decisions. we offered taylor and solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you -- for you? -- for you?
as soon as he wakes up. >> massive meteor breaking apart over russia. another meteor overnight. this one over california. dash cam video. wow. of the official falling from the sky over san francisco. [explosion] [screams] >> that was the scene in russia. we now know some 1200 people were hurt when that 11-ton meteor fell from the sky there it's estimated the explosion did about $33 million worth of damage. former chicago congressman jesse jackson jr. and his wife plea deal. scheme to use campaign donations for personal use including to buy luxury items like a $43,000 rolex watch. could face prison time and fines. police now believe rogue california former cop christopher dorner committed suicide amid a fierce shootout with officers. his bodies with found in burned out of -- autopsy results show he died single gunshot wound to the head. believed to have killed four people including two police officers. customers on that crippled cruise ship thought their nightmare was over. a bus taking them from mobile, alabama to new orleans broke down half way there. >> come on. [sigh] >> another one w
regularly. >> but her critics say she has little to show for her hard work. the reset with russia has malfunctioned, hindering any solution to the violence in syria. and middle east peace is nowhere to be seen. >> i don't think that secretary clinton has been a very consequently secretary of state. shi they'll be remembered mostly as a celebrity and a world traveler. a person with the greatest number of frequent flier miles. not for her impact on some huge policy issue, u.s.-russia, u.s.-china, some great crisis. >> clinton believes that's a narrow way of defining her role and the scope of american power. >> my first responsibility was to restore american leadership which had been tattered and damaged. so that was one of the reasons that i was out there day in and day out. and i think we not only reversed that view but we set the table for dealing with a lot of problems. >> for four years hillary clinton worked on the seventh floor of this building and traveled the globe. in the process she evolved from being a politician to being a stateswoman. and she achieved another remarkable fea
in those components on that part. you know, just as an aside, in talking about another country, russia, you know, russia desperately wants to reintroduce its self to the rest of the world. and not in some of the way that it has been. they have this opportunity with a g20 coming of in september. crystal ball. do you see anything from a coordinations standpoint from veggie 20 coming out of this? you see russia's image changing? >> well, i think this is a bigger opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen. we will just have to see. they're sitting and these are reserves. we know where the price of oil is, but there are a lot of problems. and so we have tessie weather, you know, russia can show that it is taking some of these reforms it needs to take. we will see, and this is a perfect opporunity to do so. so far, i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did anything positive was the one in london, and i give credit to gordon brown, that was his greatest moment, i think, at that particular time. the i mean, you have had very well organized meetings. i was in korea.
? a meteor comes out of nowhere and explodes over russia. you know how little nasa spends to predict these things? why it may be time to increase nasa's budget. i know you are skeptical, but wait until you hear this. plus, who wants to get on a cruise ship after this? can carnival and the cruise industry save reputations from drowning? a top marketing expert joins us on how to stay afloat. piles of "money" coming up. ♪ we asked total strangers to watch it for us. thank you so much. i appreciate it. i'll be right back. they didn't take a dime. how much in fees does your bank take to watcyour money? if your bank takes more money than a stranger, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. more "likes." more tweets. so, beginning today, my son brock and his whole team will be our new senior social media strategists. any questions? since we make radiator valves wouldn't it be better if we just let fedex help us to expand to new markets? hmm gotta admit that's better than a few "likes." i don't have the door code. who's that? he won a contest online to be ceo for the day. how
francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charge
russia, a permanent member of the u.n. security council, to put pressure on their ally, syria. they say they welcome any attempts from any side to end the conflict and end the violence happening. they have always said that they were concerned about crimes committed against humanity and they have always stressed that they will do everything that they can to support moves to end the conflict in syria. >> we will have more in a moment, but staying in brussels , they have agreed to renew an arms embargo against syria. britain wanted to allow the nation's two armed forces, but many say neither side should be armed with weapons from europe. sanctions are also amended to provide greater humanitarian and technical assistance and protection of civilians. let us turn now to nina to ask for more about the foreign minister's reasoning for renewing the arms embargo on syria. >> most eu countries are worried about the further militarization of the conflict. they say against the background reports coming in that anti- government forces have also committed war crimes but they are reluctant to send more
. russia's president brings in reinforcements. for one of his signature agenda items. you don't want to miss the grapevine next. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ >> bret: now fresh pickings from the political grapevine. hillary clinton departure from the state department today marks a milestone for washington. tomorrow will be the first day in 32 years and two weeks th
's day celebration. we are live this morning. we are they are gearing up for an event called russia with love. hottest new restaurant here as well lchlt and happens to be russian only open for two and a half weeks. we have the executive chef cooking up just for us. tell you how you can get reservations in time all live later on fox 5 morning news. stay with us. dinner's ready. [ female announcer ] hamburger helper stroganoff. beefy. creamy. stroganoffy. helpers. forty dishes, all delicious. i just finished a bowl of your light chicken pot pie soup and it was so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. you know, from our 4,000 television commercials. yep, there i am with flo. hoo-hoo! watch it! [chuckles] anyhoo, 3 million people switched to me last year, saving an average of $475. [sigh] it feels good to help people save... with great discounts like safe driver, multicar, and multipolicy. so call me today. you'll be glad you di
relationship changed and evolved with russia during the obama administration? what are the positives and negatives? guest: i think what has happened with russia, putin, who is the leader of russia, who came from the k.g.b., who came from the old soviet union, in my estimation is going back to his bad old ways. there was great hope for democracy in russia and nominally there are still elections and there's democracy but putin has consolidated power and has made it very difficult for democrats in russia to be able to have democratic government. and that's the big worry. and of course when you look at what russia has done and what china has done in the united nations, they have wielded their veto power and made it difficult for us to slap sanctions on iran, to help prevent iran from having a nuclear weapon. they have not been good players. and so i've seen russian democracy slide backwards. as long as putin is there, and it's really a shame because i think the russian people really want democracy. and i think putin is trying to be like the old communist leaders that we all remember, khr
the reset button with russia. >> we worked hard to get the right russian word. did i get it right? >> you got it wrong. >> i got it wrong. >> reporter: in burma, she saw the painful birth of democracy. she says benghazi is her greatest regret. >> i take full responsibility. at this point what doifference does it make? >> reporter: will she run in 2016? answers only prompt more speculation. >> i have absolutely no plans to run. >> reporter: she flew 1 million miles, visited 112 countries. kicked up her heels, threw back a few drinks on the side. a month of illness grounded her at the end. >> for me, it truly is a bittersweet moment to leave this room for the last time as secretary of state. >> reporter: enter the next secretary of state. >> american foreign policy is not defined by drones and deployments alone. >> reporter: john kerry, call, distinguished, gray-haired, son of a foreign service officer. >> trying to get some daylight between me and secretary clinton, that's not going to happen here today. >> reporter: as his confirmation hearing showed, the policy is likely to remain the sa
little to show for her hard work. the reset with russia has malfunctioned, hindering any solution to the violence in syria. and middle east peace is nowhere to be seen. >> i don't think that secretary clinton has been a very consequently secretary of state. shi they'll be remembered mostly as a celebrity and a world traveler. a person with the greatest number of frequent flier miles. not for her impact on some huge policy issue u.s.-russia u.s.-china, some great crisis. >> clinton believes that's a narrow way of defining her role and the scope of american power. >> my first responsibility was to restore american leadership which had been tattered and damaged. so that was one of the reasons that i was out there day in and day out. and i think we not only reversed that view but we set the table for dealing with a lot of problems. >> for four years hillary clinton worked on the seventh floor of this building and traveled the globe. in the process she evolved from being a politician to being a stateswoman. and she achieved another remarkable fe
and we went on a trip with the first lady, and a small group of journalists out to russia, and got a chance to see interesting sites, and a close-up look at hillary clinton, and one of the things that stood out in my mind, not the temples and all of that, but this moment in kazakhstan, and she was presented with a whip, and normally it's just the men that carries the whips with them, and she was considered so powerful as a first lady and she was presented with one of them, and she got a kick out of that, and there were a lot of jokes that followed that. >> right. we used to call them remember the hillary clinton trips. and they were under the radar, and there was some coverage but not as much, so you could really get to know her. it was a small group. and there was very interesting times. of course i have been following her for the past four years at the state department. >> jill, you actually said something that was pretty interesting earlier today and you wrote a whole article about it, and nobody saw her sleep. you never knew if you saw her get sleep during those trips, and she
that russia and china will not come aboard and stays within the system, stasis is the policy. this is a way of rating things. -- rigging things. if we come to a determination that the objectives that i listed before our worthy and necessary objectives, so that you have justified and and you discover that the un is precisely the antithesis of any meaningful means to accomplish this, it is pretty clear that staying within the united nations framework is a formula for doing nothing. putin has been given a veto over our foreman -- foreign policy. it unburdened the administration of the challenge of to face this problem directly. this has been going on for 22 months. if putin is not going to relent, we know about him. he believes in the heavy footprint. not a light footprint. i do is, that it was long ago time to go outside the un and the united states should find its allies. we will find such allies and we two a compost those objectives. >> are we hiding behind putin's skirts to avoid u.s. action? >> putin would love that phrase. [laughter] >> i don't think so. the reality is, it is fear of the
happened in russia a number of years ago. they did that in a movie theater. 120 people died. >> 117, probably -- what was close to 120, october of 2002 when that happened. they sent in gas, and people died from inhalation, gas poisoning. so you're right. what are the top priorities for negotiators as the standoff continues here? >> the most important thing is to have a dialogue between the hostage taker and the negotiator. you want to be able to gain credibility. everything is a negotiation. if he says i need some sodas, well, they can negotiate and to say let me talk to the child, let me know that he is okay. the bottom line to this whole thing is he has the onus of being responsible right now. and he is. he is starting to develop what we call the stockholm syndrome, which is a very important type of thing. it's bonding, and that's very important. >> how long will officials allow this standoff to continue before taking more aggressive action? >> i don't think they're going to take aggressive action. i think they'll continue to negotiate and talk. talking is the name of the game. un
and russia to stop backing assad and called to u.s. to get more involved. he says america is standing by the sidelines. >> we look the america to play an important role. >> reporter: he says the only way he will be forced out is with force. >> assad's killing will continue until he falls. only way he will leave is by military means and military force. >> reporter: fresh for a time frame, the colonel said assad had six months before he goes and if everything goes the rebels' way and there is no guarantee of that. >> chris: treasury department says it has resumed borrowing following president obama's signing of the debt deal on sunday. the treasury has borrowed already $41 billion most of it to restore pension funds. stocks were mixed today. dow gained 7. s&p 500 was up 1. nasdaq lost 3. >> a new study says obamacare will bring about the thing it was created to stop. millions of americans will lose their health insurance. jim angle says how it will happen. >> congressional budget office says under obamacare 7 million fewer people will get health insurance by 2023, an increase from the l
and feeding it back to asia or russia or whoever's controlling. >> host: you point out the executive order signed by the president, one of the first pieces of business in the state of the union address. what did he put in place and how will that prevent this from happening in the future? >> guest: what the president is trying to share information between the government and intelligence agencies that can collect information and the seize malware coming in and they see hackers coming and. what companies they believe are targeted by them. >> hostthem. that's one piece. i want to establish a set that their voluntary standards, what practices to protect their information from backing. what they call basic hygiene which is change your password, things like that. update your software, just the basics host the how often do people getting into who think it's personal, open it up and then create problems? >> guest: that's one thing, how easy it is for chinese hackers to pretty basic simple trick to get somebody to install your malware on their computer. you say hey, joe, i know we were talking about
over a long period of time and hope whoever is responsible will be punished severely. in russia's parliament, there was a moment for this young boy follow bid a series of passionate speeches by politicians claiming his death proves they were absolutely justified in passing legislation banning u.s. nationals from adopting any more russian children. they did that at the end of last year. partly in response to u.s. legislation, targeting russian human rights abusers. but also because of concerns held for a long time here by russian officials who say they are worried about the way russian orphans are treated in the united states. supporters of the adoption ban claim since the 1990s 19 other russian children have died after being adopted by americans. the russian government says it is very concerned about the welfare of russian orphans and says 60,000 have are been adopted over the last 20 years. the adoption ban is one of the key reasons why relations between the united states and russia are the worst that they have been in a long time. a line of politicians here and officials have
's point, i don't think we're doing much. i think on the diplomatic front we have hid behind russia and on the military front we have been fairly relevant to the flow of this conflict on the ground. and we sort of have had this idea of a splendid distance from syria but are not able to maintain that indefinitely. >> suarez: but does that narrow your choices when you decide what you is to do, andrew, to fight that irrelevance as vali called it. >> the problem is when you get involved in a game late, you're cornered. and you also have to intervene in ways you might not have wanted to do from the beginning. so in the case of ot bama administration very reticent to get involved with armed groups, but now we are looking at something very real. real threat of the use of chemical weapons. the possibility of a failed state in a divided state in syria. and also a haven for terrorists and the propensity for all of that to spill over its borders into the vital allies like israel, like turkey, iraq, jordan and so on and also into lebanon grows every day with no end in sight. >> suarez: but you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)